The word “couscous” is of Berber origin, which means “well formed, well rolled, rounded”. Many people would think couscous is a type of grain, but couscous is actually made from semolina, the coarse, purified wheat middlings of durum wheat, which is the same ingredient that goes into making pasta.

Couscous, a vegan friendly food, is traditionally made by moistening semolina, this is done by sprinkling semolina with water, then rolling it into small grain-like pellets.

Nutritional value of Couscous

Couscous contains mainly carbohydrates and pretty good levels of protein and fibre. It has very little fat and may contain some calcium, magnesium, iron and zinc, as well as some vitamin B and E.

However, as couscous is commonly made from semolina (wheat origin), it is not a gluten-free option and not suitable for those with gluten intolerance or celiac disease.

The recommended serving size for couscous is about 80-100g, which is equal to 1 cup of dried couscous (makes 2-2.5 cups of cooked couscous). However, the serving size should be adjusted depending on what you are serving this with.

Cooking Couscous

Cooking couscous is very simple, all you need to do is boil couscous in water for 5-15 minutes, as the cooking time may vary between different brands.

The texture of couscous is similar to pasta, expect it to be firm and chewy and enjoy its fluffiness when cooked.

On its own, couscous makes a quick replacement for rice or other grains to be served as a plain side, but it is so versatile to be mixed with other ingredients to turn into salads, stuffings and other side dishes. It is also a good lunch box option as it can be kept quite well after cooked.

Well-cooked couscous should be fluffy with a mild nutty, sweet flavour. Here are some cooking tips to get it perfectly fluffy and yummy:

  • Do not add too much water- A general guide is to cook couscous with boiling water in the ratio 1:1.5.

  • Do not leave cooked couscous for too long to clump. Add some oil as you fluff them up, this will help keep them from clumping.
  • Use a fork (instead of a spoon) to fluff the couscous to prevent them from becoming lumpy.
  • Dried herbs and spices can be added to raw couscous, cooking them together is a wonderful way to add flavour to the couscous
  • Alternatively, cooked couscous can be seasoned with fresh herbs like parsley, mint, coriander, garlic, spring onion etc for extra flavour

Check out the Lemon Herb Couscous Salad recipe featuring our new product: Organic Whole Wheat Couscous!

Types of Couscous

At ZENXIN, you can find a variety of organic couscous made from different ingredients:

Organic Whole Wheat Couscous:

  • Made from organic whole wheat durum wheat semolina
  • High in dietary fibre
  • Has mild nutty, sweet flavour
  • Vegan-friendly
  • Product of Italy
  • Certified organic by NASAA and USDA

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Organic White Couscous

  • Made from organic durum wheat semolina
  • Vegan-friendly
  • Product of Italy
  • Certified organic by NASAA and USDA

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Organic Spelt Couscous

  • Made from organic whole wheat spelt
  • High in dietary fibre
  • Vegan-friendly
  • Has nuttier, earthy flavour
  • Product of Italy
  • Certified organic by NASAA and USDA

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Organic Corn Couscous

  • Made from organic corn (Gluten-free couscous)
  • Non-GMO
  • Rich in zeaxanthin and lutein- good for vision and skin health
  • Vegan-friendly
  • Product of Italy
  • Certified organic by NASAA and USDA

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